Cigars and Cold Weather

Well friends, the check’s in the mail. Damned if it’s not already time to break out the flannels and let my beard grow in. The lawnmower has already gone into hibernation. Next thing you know I’ll be raking leaves, then shoveling snow and scraping ice.

This also marks another year spending my hard-earned paycheck on everything but a heat and ventilation system for my detached garage. Score one for the missus.

What to do now? The way I see it, I have a couple options:

  1. Quit smoking cigars
    Ha! C’mon… that’s obviously not going to happen.
  2. Move someplace warm
    Yeah…maybe when I retire.
  3. Invest in Petit Coronas like Rocky Patel Juniors or Famous Buenos Maduritos
    This solution, while inelegant, is probably the most realistic. Doesn’t mean I won’t ever-so-slightly resent having to fight off shivering outside. On the flipside, it’s a reason to indulge in a generous ration of whisky.
  4. Buy an outdoor propane heater
    Another possibility, but it does nothing to protect against bitter-cold winter wind.
  5. Stew in a bath of cigar smoke in a cold (but windless) garage
    It’s highly likely that I’ll be doing this more than once this winter. This approach requires a post-cigar shower and change of clothes, though.
  6. Invest in heat and ventilation for the garage
    This could be just inside the realm of possibility…I need to investigate indoor propane heaters.

If you, too, will know the icy sting of winter this year, I want to hear your suggestions! Is there some option I’m missing here?

If, however, you’re from somewhere that’s warm year-round, kindly keep your comments to yourself (kidding, of course).

Hayward Tenney

Author:

When he's not busy writing, editing, smoking cigars, or raising his many, many children, Hayward "It's Lou, not Hayward" Tenney spends his days combating confusion about his real name (it's Hayward, but please - call him "Lou") and mourning the matrimonially-induced loss of his moustache (what's he gonna do with all that moustache wax he made?).

Comments

  1. If you live in a location that has basements or even have a spare bedroom (and a go with the flow spouse), go ahead and build a smoking room.

    I built mine for under $1,000 including drywall, lumber, electrical, flooring, insulation, and my 745CFM exhaust fan. Do the work yourself, you’ll appreciate it that much more while you are sitting in there in shorts and a t-shirt looking at your remote thermometer telling you that it’s 3 degrees on your front porch.

  2. ShawnTheRoaster says:

    Or….just getting your wife to let you smoke in the house once in a while ;-)

  3. ACogswell says:

    It seems that sitting in the garage is the best option…..though I hate the idea of a shower and change of clothes when I am done.

  4. Stewart Levine says:

    You could do what I did 45 years ago. Move to the sunny South, Louisiana then Texas, where they close the schools when there’s a threat of snow in the weather forecast.

  5. E. T. says:

    Hot Tub. Works for me.

  6. tommyzman says:

    The dead of winter in northern New Jersey is just the worst time of year because it really just too damned frigid to enjoy a cigar. I bought a decent heater for the garage last year, but your feet and hands still freeze and it just sucks! Unfortunately, the only real answer I found that works is a trip to Florida!

  7. dan says:

    Get a hot tub….they’re awesome and at 102degrees…no need to rush

  8. Steven Loizos says:

    I have a 30×30 garage made a 14×14 cigar room….perfect…heat,carpet,big screen tv,my fish tanks,lazy boy and a couch and the walls covered with MY crap….MY piece of HEAVEN

  9. Joe Casale says:

    We have two wood burning fireplaces in the house. I buy a cord of of wood in the beginning of the winter season.
    I only smoke one cigar a day , so at the end of the day get 6-8 logs and make a fire in the lower level fireplace .
    I sit 4-8 feet away from the open fire and all the smoke is drawn up the chiminy.
    No smell of smoke in the morning “problem solved”
    Most important everyone is happy.

  10. dave says:

    Up here in the cold climate of Ontario Canada, nothing works better than a hot tub and cigar! But….. on those nice no wind sunny winter days , dress warm and you still can’t beat it!!

  11. wbdjr says:

    I live in Colorado Springs, CO and smoke cigars year round on the golf course. Skiing is in the mountains and golf along the front range. What is the best way to keep cigars from exploding or having the wrapper unravel?

  12. Go2Golfman says:

    Yes, trying to enjoy a smoke here in Wisconsin in the winter is a challenge. The solution is very simple… You add a “smoking room” onto your home! A nice fully finished insulated four season room with an electric fireplace, lots of windows for light, summer ventilation and added winter warmth, an exhaust fan, some Havana looking wicker furniture, a small flat screen and about $35,000 later you have a great place to enjoy your favorite sticks all year long. It was worth every cent as now I have my place to smoke and my wife actually enjoys sitting with me while reading or watching a little TV!

  13. Paul says:

    In the basement of many houses here in the frozen north, there is usually an adjoining room often called a “crawl space”. Despite the name, one can often enter without crawling, although the height may not be more than 5.5 ft.

    I removed the junk that can accumulate there, put in a nice warm chair, and had a guy install a door and a small bathroom fan which vents the smoke outside. In the dead of winter, a space heater is needed. And I will admit it’s not the cheeriest of places to have a cigar, and visits there do raise spousal eyebrows…but as long as you are accompanied by a good book, an Ipad, a drink etc. it works well. Just remember to let the fan run for a while after you leave, be very fire conscious, and leave an odour remover open overnight.

    Works for me, but hats off to the lucky few who have a hot tub and don’t mind the winter maintenance on it.

  14. Rob Horken says:

    Here in Minnesota cold temperatures can get to 30 degrees below zero. A few years ago I purchased a metal cigar tube. I go outside and enjoy my cigar until I start to freeze up. Then I put the remaining cigar in the tube. The tube extinguishes my cigar and I can go our later or save it for the next day.

  15. PoconoJoe says:

    DID SOMEONE SAY, SMOKING IN MY OWN CAR ?
    WHAT ABOUT THE LOCAL CIGAR BAR
    MY FAVORITE PLACE IS IN MY CAR. I START THE ENGINE, START MY CIGAR, POP ON THE HEATER, VENT THE WINDOW & I’M FINE.

  16. cigarstogies says:

    Buenos Maduritos and pacing for me…quick smoke while the pacing keeps my blood flowing…

    http://www.famous-smoke.com/famous+buenos+maduritos+cigars/item+17243

  17. smoke 'em if ya got 'em says:

    I bought a house five years ago. One of the reasons I chose this house was the small third bedroom off of the great room. The previous owners used it as a bedroom for their infant. I immediately saw it’s potential as my cigar room. The room is 10′ x 12′ but feels larger due to its high ceiling and huge arched window. I put real oak flooring in and painted the room British racing green. I had a cabinet maker open the closet up and custom build an oak bookcase which fit perfectly into the opening. He then made custom molding and retrimmed the window, baseboard and bookshelf. I hung a beautiful contemporary light fixture and added two leather and oak reclining chairs. I brought in my end table humidor and a few other details such as a brass lamp and spitoon. Finally, I had a powerful exhaust fan installed remotely in the attic with two 6″ vents above the chairs. The fan is located away from the room so you can’t hear it running. New oak french doors greet you into my winter paradise in Upstate New York. Stop by and enjoy a smoke!

  18. Troels says:

    Had a smoke outside this evening, in minus 8 degrees Celsius – a beautiful cuaba el 2008 that started as a dream, but after an inch or so the draw got progressively poorer. It didn’t seem plugged, so I cut of another few mm – and as I did so, I could see that the cigar was frozen at the head.the moist in the smoke must have condensed and frozen! As the cigar was a pyramid was a pyramid I could cut the hole wider, which helped – but worth considering the risk before you light a prime cigar when freezing outside