Davidoff Nicaragua Cigar Review

Introduction and Initial Impressions

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Gary Korb gives his Davidoff Nicaragua cigar review

Davidoff Nicaragua cigars are the first all-Nicaraguan leaf blend from the world’s most distinguished luxury-class cigar manufacturer. 10 years in the making, Davidoff’s blending sensei, Hendrik Kelner, has done it again. Offered in only three shapes, Toro (5½” x 54), Robusto (5″ x 50), and Short Robusto (3¾” x 46), the core blend consists of longfiller tobaccos from Estelí, Condega, Jalapa, and the rich volcanic soil of Ometepe, aged a minimum of eight years. On initial inspection, these puros boast shimmering, 10-year-aged Habano-seed wrappers cured to a uniform Rosado hue and impeccable construction. For example, not only is the rolling seamless, but feeling my way along the length of the cigars I noticed there were virtually no soft spots. Now it’s time for me to light this beautiful cigar up and provide all of you with my Davidoff Nicaragua cigar review!

Davidoff Nicaragua Cigar Review

All three Davidoff Nicaragua frontmarks delivered the rich, spicy flavor and exceptional smoothness as advertised. I used both punch and double blade cutters on them and the deliverables were essentially the same: an excellent draw with a sweet and cedary pre-light, a flawlessly applied cap, an appealing sweetness with some peppery notes in the first few puffs and a redolent aroma. The cigar lights quickly, too. Another outstanding thing about this cigar is the retrohale. You might think that a cigar with this much Nicaraguan tobacco would produce a very peppery retrohale. Such was not the case. The retrohale produced only smooth, creamy smoke. This I found extremely impressive.

As for the base flavors, I picked-up some charred cedar, dark chocolate, and peppery spice. The burn was razor sharp, producing a firm grey ash.

The cigar mellows somewhat along the way, but as the cigar approaches the “sweet spot,” which is just as you enter the halfway mark, it blooms into a much more complex smoke. The only exception is the Short Corona. Due to its small size, it tends to burn a little hotter, but because you’re smoking a lot more wrapper, you may discover a better appreciation for this wonderful leaf that ties it all together.

Conclusion

For a company that’s built their reputation on producing outstanding Dominican cigars, Davidoff has done a great job with their new Davidoff Nicaragua line. It’s exactly what you’d expect from a luxury-class Nicaraguan

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The Davidoff Nicaragua line was rated the #3 cigar of the year for 2013

cigar: plenty of pepper and spice, an impressive complexity, plus all the refinement and painstaking attention to detail for which Davidoff cigars are known. The cigars start out with a medium body, amping-up the voltage in small increments, and eventually making for a remarkably consistent and complex smoke. Cigar smokers who have acquired a taste for bold Nicaraguan cigars will appreciate the Davidoff Nicaragua selection. Perfect for enjoying after a big meal, or unburdening yourself from the stress of a long workday, they’re not cheap cigars, but well worth the investment. I hope you all have enjoyed reading my Davidoff Nicaragua cigar review as much as I enjoyed smoking the cigar!

Davidoff Nicaragua Blend Info
Country of Origin: Dominican Republic
Strength:  Full
Wrapper: 10 Year-Aged Habano seed Nicaraguan Rosado
Filler:  1/4 Estelí Ligero, plus Estelí Viso, Condega Ligero, and Ometepe Viso
Binder:  Habano seed Jalapa
Presentation: Boxes / Packs / Singles

 

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Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.