Tagged: cigar lighter


Filling your cigar lighter Some things are so intuitively easy you hardly have to think about them. Starting a car, making coffee with a K-cup, buttoning a shirt. You’d think that refilling a cigar lighter would be just as simple, right? Yes, but there’s a little more to it than you think, and by following the instruction guide below, you’ll not only learn how to fill your cigar torch lighter correctly, you’ll add many more months, even years, to its lifespan. Continue reading

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Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

xikar ex windproof

Xikar EX Windproof

If “sometimes a cigar is just a cigar,” could the same be said for cigar lighters? Maybe, but like cigars, the tools for igniting them are almost as multitudinous as bird species. For the purposes of this post we’re going to focus on the most popular jet lighters used for lighting cigars, as well as how and when to use them. From single jet designs like the XiKAR EX Windproof lighter, to lighters with special tools, like the Vertigo Golf lighter with its built-in divot tool, to the Vertigo Intimidator with its four jets and futuristic design, there’s a torch lighter for every cigar lover. Continue reading

Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

Gary KorbThere are many different tricks and theories on how to light a cigar. I wanted to share one of my favorite tips that will help you get the most from your smoke. When toasting your cigars, etiquette dictates that you’re not supposed to let the flame touch the tobacco at the foot. Rather, the flame should be held close enough to the tobacco to get the foot glowing without it catching fire. Once you see red (so to speak), gently blow on the foot until the entire surface is glowing all the way out to the last ring.

Continue reading

Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

Gary KorbI recently ran a survey question on Cigar Advisor asking if smokers rotated their cigar accessories. After all, you rotate your cigars, so why not your accessories? As of this writing, 37% did not rotate their cigar accessories, per se, they just wait until one or the other breaks and buy a new one. But running second at 31% was “It depends on the cigar.”

This may sound like an off-beat topic, but as I get a lot of my subject matter, it came from my own personal experience. One night, I was about to light-up a cigar in my “man cave” (a/k/a the basement), and instead of using my usual “everyday” lighter, I took out my dual torch lighter. As I was doing this I wondered, Do other cigar smokers rotate their cigar accessories?” And so, there it is.

cigar accessories

Cigar cutters are an essential cigar accessory

I’ve got a decent amount of cigar cutters and lighters I’ve collected over the years. They include a few Xikar cigar cutters, several other double-blade guillotine cutters, a couple of V-cutters, and a pair of small folding cigar scissors. I suppose I should also include the punch cutters built-in to two of my lighters, but they’re not that sharp. Speaking of lighters, I have several single jet torch lighters (one of which I keep in my car for emergencies), a double and a triple jet model, plus a Zippo.

What’s interesting is that each of these tools can serve a specific purpose. For example, one of the reasons I switched to my twin torch was because the cigar I chose that night had a 50 ring, and the two flames seem to work better, especially during toasting. For even wider cigars, I might even pull out the triple flame. Sometimes I’ll opt for a V-cutter to clip a Torpedo, rather than a double blade. Or, I’ll use a punch cutter to make a “figure 8″ or “cloverleaf” cut in the head of a 50+ ringer.

That said, one might be inclined to presume that a good number of cigar smokers also rotate their lighters and cutters. According to the survey, only 18%. rotate their cigar accessories for the sheer purpose of giving them “equal usage.” However, if 31% of smokers are using different cigar accessories depending on the type of cigar they plan to smoke, then they really are rotating their cutters and lighters. I suppose I would be a member of this group.

What I find even more surprising is that 14% of the cigar smokers polled so far had only one cutter and lighter. Huh! I figured that even the one to three cigars-per-week smoker would have at least a couple of cutters and lighters. In my opinion, it is to every cigar smoker’s advantage to have a few couple or even a few of each. You never know when your lighter is going to fire-off its last round ever, or when your cutter has become so dull, you might as well use a butter knife to clip it (though the latter is easier to gauge.)

As I write this, Thanksgiving is behind us and we’re officially into the Holiday season. If you’re among those who only have one cutter and lighter, with all the sales happening, now’s a great time to add at least another of each to your collection of cigar accessories. If you have a single flame lighter, pick up a dual or triple flame. If you prefer buying cheap cutters, be adventurous and pick up a high quality blade that will last more like two years rather than two months.

Finally, if you’re in the camp that has a good variety of cigar accessories, more power to you. Whether you intentionally rotate them is not all that important. It’s more like, if you got ‘em, you might as well use ‘em.

Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

You know how to whistle, don’t you, Steve? You just put your lips together and blow.”

- Marie Browning (Lauren Bacall) in To Have and Have Not

using cigar torch lightersA while back I blogged about cigar lighting techniques. In the article, I referred to one of the methods as “The ‘Overkill’.” “…using this method, the smoker keeps hitting the blackened areas of the foot with the torch flame until they glow like a branding iron. All this does is cause the tobacco to produce more tars, which may turn the cigar prematurely bitter,” I wrote.

As a cigar smoker, one thing you need to remember when using torch lighters is that the flame is highly concentrated. Moreover, the reason torch lighters are so effective is that the blue inner cone (about 1/16 of an inch inside the flame), is the hottest part of the flame, and therefore, much hotter than the white flame of a match or “soft flame” lighter. That’s also why you should be even more careful when toasting your cigars.*

The secret to properly toasting good premium cigars is to hold the flame from a torch lighter just shy of the tobacco until it turns black. You want to do the same during the lighting stage, until you see the core tobaccos glowing. Note that you may only see a portion of the core glowing. At this point you would normally blow gently on the foot to spread the fire throughout the entire width of the foot.

Here’s where the torch flame overkill usually comes in. If after blowing on the cigar, the remaining core doesn’t catch quickly, many a cigar smoker will hit it again and even hold it until they get the aforementioned “branding iron” effect.

The reason not all of the tobaccos take right away usually has to do with the amount of moisture in the tobaccos, and/or how much ligero is in the mix. Ligero is the oiliest of the leaves and it’s one of the reasons the more combustible binder leaves are part of the blend; they help get your cigars started and keep them burning evenly. Therefore, if you absolutely have to hit it again, you may be better off concentrating on the ring where the binder is, just inside the outer wrapper leaf.

Suffice it to say that, rather than holding the foot to the fire (so to speak),
continue blowing on it. If it’s a well-made cigar, eventually the entire core will take. You don’t need more flame; what you need is more patience.

 

* Author’s note: When I first published this blog, I incorrectly stated that the white part of the flame from torch lighters was the hottest.

Famous Smoke Shop

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The world's fastest, friendliest, and best place to buy cigars! Since 1939, Famous Smoke Shop has prided itself on offering the freshest, largest selection cigars at the most competitive prices, and customer service that can't be beat.

When you light-up a cigar you probably don’t think very much about how you light it. Well, as a “professional cigar smoker,” this is one of the things I do think about, so I thought it might be fun to look at the different techniques people use to light their cigars.

Before I get into them, here are a couple of things to keep in mind with regard to flame. The blue portion of the flame is the hottest. This is why torch lighters are so effective for lighting cigars. Moreover, this uber-hot flame permits you to “toast” and light your cigars without scorching them. As described below, if you can help it, you really don’t want the flame touching the tobacco. That’s especially important in this case, because the blue flame is so hot, you can hold the torch several inches from the foot of the cigar and still get a really good light.

That brings us to the white part of the flame. This part of the flame is pretty damn hot, too. Want to find out? Hold your open hand palm down about 6 inches above the tip of a “soft” butane flame, or a match. You’ll feel the heat almost instantly. This is also why you needn’t touch the tobacco when using a regular butane lighter or match. If it can burn your skin from that distance, imagine what it can do to a razor thin wrapper leaf at close range.

And speaking of matches, if you prefer to use them over a lighter, use a long cedar wood match rather than book matches. They offer a nice aroma when lit, and give you more time to get the job done.

I think the reason so many cigar smokers just “go for it” is that they don’t have the patience to light a cigar in the traditional method, which I’ve summarized below.

Without repeating the whole sequence here, basically it’s a two-step process: Toast the foot entirely, blow on it until it glows all red, then holding the cigar in your mouth at about a 45-degree angle, apply the flame without actually touching the tobacco and puff, drawing the smoke slowly through the head.

The “Flame Thrower”

This is where the cigar smoker clips the cigar, puts flame right to the foot and puffs away. No toasting, just flick the ignition switch and go, usually with fire emanating from the foot like a dragster doing the quarter-mile.

The “Roll, Puff and Blow”

A little closer to the traditional method. The cigar is toasted, then the smoker rotates the cigar while applying flame to the foot and puffing. Once the smoke takes, turn the foot toward you and blow on it. This helps ensure that the entire foot gets lit evenly.

The “Overkill” method

This is similar to the above method except during the toasting process you blow on the foot to see how you’re doing. You notice some black, unlit areas still left on the foot. Normally, you would gently blow on the foot while rotating the cigar to allow these areas to catch. But using this method, the smoker keeps hitting the blackened areas of the foot with the torch flame until they glow like a branding iron. All this does is cause the tobacco to produce more tars, which may turn the cigar prematurely bitter.

The “Torch/Match Switch-A-Roo”

I kind of like this one, though it involves a little extra work. The cigar is first toasted with a torch lighter, followed by a cedar match (or a soft butane flame) to complete the process. The advantage of this is you get the best of both worlds. A cooler flame to toast the cigar followed by a white-hot flame to ensure the tobacco takes completely.

The “Three Matches” method

This is very cool. I saw Gordon Mott do this in a video a while back titled Three Matches. You need three long cedar matches for this one, and it takes a lot of patience.
Important: Do not clip the cigar first! I’ll explain why later.

Light the first match, hold it in close to and in front of the cigar and rotate the cigar as you toast it. Eventually the match will burn down. Be sure to knock-off the ash of the match as you go to keep it burning properly. Put it out and immediately move on to the second match, concentrating on the center portion of the foot as you continue to rotate the cigar. Again, this must be done very slowly. By the end of the third match, the foot should be pretty well lit and emanating a good amount of smoke. At this point, clip the head and draw on the cigar. That’s it!

The reason for not clipping the cigar first is, the gentleman who showed Mott how to do this felt that aromas and flavors coming from the flame source could pass through the cigar and affect the flavor of the tobacco. Personally, I don’t buy it, especially when torch lighters burn so clean. Moreover, Mott admits that he hardly ever uses this technique due to time constraints, but it’s fun to try when you do have the time.

Regardless of how they were taught to light a premium handmade, most cigar smokers eventually develop their own personal method for getting the job done. Sometimes I see someone lighting-up and I want to cringe, but in the end it’s really a matter of to each his own. Or, to look at it another way, when was the last time you corrected someone on how to light their cigar?

Finally, your own personal cigar lighting methods are welcome in the comments field.

G~

 

Editor’s Note: This post was updated on June 5, 2012.

Famous Smoke Shop

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The world's fastest, friendliest, and best place to buy cigars! Since 1939, Famous Smoke Shop has prided itself on offering the freshest, largest selection cigars at the most competitive prices, and customer service that can't be beat.