Tagged: cigar smoking


coffee-addict-240x300

What is it about coffee that keeps us coming back for more? Is it truly the caffeine or is it something else…the aroma, the taste, the sense of gathering a cup of coffee brings.

I often wonder about that question, and the answer is “yes.”  You could ask the same question about coffee. If you have a cup of coffee every morning, it’s probably more of a habit – something you do on a regular basis – than an addiction. But if you drink 10 cups of coffee a day, one could make the case for addiction.

Whether it’s smoking cigars, playing online poker, or watching reality TV, just about anything can become addictive. What starts often as a hobby for some cigar smokers, may eventually become habitual, and beyond that, addictive. How do you define the three? Cigar smoking as a hobby would apply to a friend of mine who smokes only several cigars a month, though he might smoke more often if his wife wasn’t so insistent he take it outside. He also does a lot of domestic and international travel, and there are very few places left in the world where one can enjoy the company of a good cigar and a libation; so that also keeps his smoking to a bare minimum, but he’s fine with it. As Yoda would say, “A bona fide cigar hobbyist, he is.” Continue reading

Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

Put Your Cigar Knowledge To The Test With Our Cigar Quiz!

Put Your Cigar Knowledge To The Test With Our Cigar Quiz!

One of the main things experienced cigar enthusiasts learn is that there’s always something new to learn about cigars. The exchange and passing along of cigar knowledge is a time-honored tradition in world of cigar smoking, as experiences BOTLs and SOTLs share their experiences, tips, and tricks with new smokers just starting to become interested in the hobby. We put together this little test so you can see how much of an expert you are, pit your knowledge against your smoking buddies, and maybe teach you something new! Continue reading

Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

cigar smoking tricks

Blowing smoke rings is one of the all time classic cigar smoking tricks.

How’s this? You’re hanging out with your compañeros, enjoying some cigars, drinks, snacks, etc., and you reach one of those moments when everyone goes silent. Here are my picks for the top 10 cigar smoking tricks you can do with your cigars to liven up the mood. Continue reading

Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

Gary Korb

A natural “solution” for cigar smokers with sinus problems

I’ve suffered with sinus troubles most of my life. Clogged sinuses, sinus headaches, you-name-it. Whatever problems are commonly associated with the nose, chances are I’ve had them. Moreover, as someone who smokes cigars for a living, I occasionally find my sinuses stuffed-up. I also believe it’s related to how many cigars I’ve smoked in a day. In the past, I would usually take a decongestant, but a couple of years ago I discovered the neti pot. In fact, I learned about the neti pot on a cigar forum. Continue reading

Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

Gary KorbHave you ever noticed how many things are seasonal? Fruits and veggies, sports, ice fishing – even beers are seasonal. You might opt for an IPA or a refreshing pale ale during the summer, and a Porter or Stout during the winter. Could the same be said for premium cigars? Why not?

Using the beer example above, bolder cigars would be smoked during the late fall and winter months, while lighter-bodied cigars would be smoked during the late spring and summer. As always, it’s a matter of personal preference. So what cigars are best for smoking during different times of the year? To tell the truth, I’ve never thought about it all that much; I just smoke whatever I feel like regardless of the season. Moreover, I would guess most cigar smokers have a similar routine. Then again, there are cigar smokers who like to change things up every now and then; if not seasonally, then perhaps for a couple of weeks to a month. I tend to move back and forth from full-bodied to milder cigars. Yet, this is something I do year-round, so it’s not “seasonal” in my case.

For the sake of argument, let’s say that most cigar smokers do smoke milder cigars in the Spring/Summer months and robust cigars in the Fall/Winter months. Here’s the logic: again, going back to the seasonal beer example, during the summer, you tend to smoke more cigars. Therefore, one might prefer to smoke more mild cigars than full-bodied smokes, whereas during the winter months, one might prefer a stronger cigar. Why? It all comes down to the amount of nicotine one can handle, or for that matter, prefer. Generally speaking, smoking one or two full-bodied cigars in a sitting during the winter, would be equivalent to smoking four to five mild-to-medium-bodied cigars in the summer.

Then what about those who live in states like Florida, Arizona, or southern California? It would be unfair to assume that cigar smokers in those parts of the country are smoking mild and medium-bodied cigars year-round, because it’s not true. I think this “seasonal cigar” theory may apply more to occasional cigar smokers like those who smoke a few cigars a week. True-blue cigar smokers smoke cigars of every strength, and I think it’s fair to assume in their case, that they smoke whatever they like depending on their mood. After all, you’re always going to have cigar smokers who prefer mild and medium-bodied cigars year-round, while the same can be said for those who prefer the hard-core, headier cigars, regardless of their locale.

If you think there is any validity to this theory (or not),
or this is something that you practice, please be sure to leave a comment. In the meantime, I think I’ll do a survey about this on CigarAdvisor.com and find out what the real deal is.

Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

After taking the cigar world by storm several years ago with the introduction of two unprecedented “firsts” for premium cigars, Sam Leccia has struck out on his own with a new line of cigars produced and distributed through his new, aptly-named Sam Leccia Cigar Company.

 


Sam Leccia Cigar Co.

Sam Leccia

Sam Leccia has left Oliva Cigar Co to start his own company.

Gary Korb: What was the first cigar you ever smoked, and what do you remember most about it?

Sam Leccia:. I actually remember my first cigar quite well. I was in 10th grade. Me and my two buddies, Vince and Tom, pitched-in and bought a box of Phillies blunts. I can remember opening that box when we got home. I had cigar boxes around the house with baseball cards and matchbox cars in them; this was the first one that I had with actual cigars in it. We were so pumped to smoke them. Then we got into other cigars, like hand-rolled cigars. I remember my first hand rolled. It was a Macanudo and I spent $6.00 on it, which on a 15 year-old’s budget was insane, but I felt like I was on top of the world smoking it. I used to always go into the cigar store at the local mall just to enjoy the aromas of the walk-in humidor. I was hooked. The funny thing is, growing up my Dad always insisted that I didn’t smoke or drink, and yet my career has been both in the liquor and now tobacco industry. Sorry Dad.

GK: How did you decide on the name “Debut” for your first release?

Sam: Names are not easy to come up with, and usually are more important to the company using it rather than everyone else. I gave a lot of thought to various names. Some I will probably use down the road, but this is my first solo release, so what better than Debut?

GK: Where is your company and factory based?

Sam: My company is based in Pittsburgh, Pa, still out of my garage, but the factory that’s making Debut is in Honduras.

GK: Can you give us some background about the tobaccos used in Debut blend and how you developed it; for instance, when you knew it was ready, etc.?

Sam: I am excited about the blend. It’s the most fun of the entire process. The blend consists of tobaccos from Honduras, Nicaragua, Ecuador and Santo Domingo. The wrapper ages well and the oils really rise to the surface after some aging. I love a good oily wrapper, and this truly delivers beyond my expectations. As far as ‘when I knew it was ready,’ just like finding your soul mate, you know when you know.

GK: Why did you decide to go with 60 gauge ring sizes for two of the three Debut frontmarks?

Sam: Well it’s no secret that I like a 60 ring. I wanted to put my twist on traditional sizes. I didn’t want to come up with some new name for a size, I like the length of both the Robusto and Churchill, I just gave them more tobacco. Though, the figurado is a traditional 6 ½ X 52 Torpedo.

GK: How much of a part will social media sites like Facebook and Twitter play in marketing your cigars?

Sam: I enjoy Facebook and Twitter. I have reconnected with so many people: old Navy buddies, school friends, and I can stay in touch with people I meet in my travels. I don’t really build a strategy around using Facebook or Twitter, rather, I just use it like everyone else does to update my friends on my life. It just so happens my life is cigars, so it turns into to some form of marketing, but that’s not truly why I use it.

GK: The cigars that brought you to prominence were true “firsts.” Does the Sam Leccia Cigar Company have plans for producing something just as unique in the future?

Sam: You know, I look at things differently now. I am different. I am a nonconformist by nature. I like to try new things and have fun. The goal is to just bring some excitement to an industry that I am excited about being in. I could easily make traditional blends in traditional sizes but that’s just not who I am. I honor tradition by creating new cigars. I have lots up my sleeve.

GK: Since going rogue, what has been the most surprising thing that has happened?

Sam: Your question makes me sound like some kind of Sarah Palin (laughs),
but the answer is, I enjoy the freedom. It’s liberating.

GK: What do cigar smokers seem to misunderstand about you?

Sam: I can probably write a book based on this question alone. Some people expect me to be a 6-foot 6-inch hard-ass, but I’m a soft spoken, 5-foot 7-inch regular Joe. I’m a creative thinker and I’m kind and generous. I certainly don’t think of myself as any sort of ‘celebrity.’ I say this all the time but, I have no paparazzi on my lawn; no one bothers me in grocery stores or the mall; and I highly doubt anyone tells Kid Rock that he “looks like Sam Leccia”. I’m as real as it gets and I enjoy meeting and hanging out with the cigar smoking nation.

GK: Will you be introducing Debut at the upcoming IPCPR show in Las Vegas this summer and doing other major cigar events?

Sam: I am currently taking pre-orders and plan to start shipping before the show. I’m in kind of a difficult situation, as my first run looks to have already been pre-sold. I know that sounds like a good thing, but I want to meet the demand without sacrificing quality. I will be at the IPCPR, and I can’t wait to hit the road and reconnect with all of my cigar smoking friends.

GK: I heard that you are not using a traditional wood box for your cigars. How will they be packaged?

Sam: I am using a box made from thick chipboard. It is made from 100% recycled materials and manufactured here in the USA. I don’t profess to be ‘green’ but I can sleep better at night knowing that I am not responsible for one tree cut down in the rain forest to make my boxes. Central America’s rain forests are being depleted; I am proud not to have a hand in that. I’m very excited about the boxes; they look amazing and I hope others follow suit.

GK: If you could compare yours cigars to one of your favorite bands, which would it be, and why?

Sam: Wow. That’s a tough question. I love music to no end – I am an amateur singer and lyricist, but to compare what I do to any of the music and bands that I love, I just can’t do it.

 


 

Contact info
Pre-orders and general inquiries about the Sam Leccia Cigar Company: SamsDebut@SamLecciaCigarCo.com

Links
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/sam.leccia
Website: http://www.samlecciacigarco.com

Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

Hayward Tenney cigars and fatherhoodIf you’re a cigar-smoking Mom or Dad, I want to hear from you.

Like any good father, I want what’s best for my kids. With my oldest still under 4, they’re still pretty far removed from chats about sex, drugs, and rock ‘n roll. But sooner or later, they’re going to start asking material questions about cigars and why I smoke them. The issues surrounding cigars and fatherhood are complex, and they’re going to receive a lot of information from a lot of different sources about cigars and tobacco products in general.

My oldest already knows what cigars are. He saw a cigar in the ashtray and asked me what it was, and I answered him frankly. I’m not about to insult his intelligence by pretending not to hear his question, or by spouting off some falsehood.

I guess the bottom line is this: I’m not interested in indoctrinating him in any way, but neither am I about to hide my cabinet humidor.

I DO consciously abstain from smoking in their presence. While I’m not ashamed of cigars, smoking is not a behavior I wish to normalize in their worldview. Besides, with few exceptions, actually enjoying one when they’re about is near-impossible.

Do I look forward to sharing a cigar with my kids someday? Sure, when they’re 18 and old enough to know the difference between occasionally enjoying a fine cigar and chain-smoking cigarettes. I plan to teach them about enjoying cigars responsibly, and make sure they’re aware of the health risks associated with tobacco. I believe that adults have the right to make an informed decision about tobacco use, and when it comes to cigars and fatherhood, I plan to help inform my children so they can make their own choice when the time comes.

How do/did you handle the smoking question vis-à-vis cigars? Are there any tips on cigars and fatherhood that you can give to a relative rookie Dad? Thanks in advance.

Hayward Tenney

Author:

When he's not busy writing, editing, smoking cigars, or raising his many, many children, Hayward "It's Lou, not Hayward" Tenney spends his days combating confusion about his real name (it's Hayward, but please - call him "Lou") and mourning the matrimonially-induced loss of his moustache (what's he gonna do with all that moustache wax he made?).

Hayward Tenney loves his man caveBetween the economy and my third kid on the way, it’s getting harder and harder to justify a night out at the bar. But when an old friend calls you up out of the blue and wants to get together for drinks on a weeknight, what else is there to do?

My buddy is in a similar position as I am: Married working man with a couple kids and a mortgage. Neither of us is in a position to be throwing money around on drinks. Moreover, it’s been tough to get together, given our schedules and the hours that separate us.

With a humidor stocked full of cigars and a beer-laden fridge, staying in was all-too-easy a decision.

First of all, the economics are staggering. For the tap price of a domestic pint, I can enjoy a couple microbrews. Instead of an average craft beer, I can dip into some esoteric Belgian beers, or a few fingers of single malt scotch or barrel-aged rum.

Add to that my man cave’s utter lack of macho assholes and drink-grubbing girls bedecked in hot pants and tube tops, and you’ve got a rough idea of why I mostly pass on the bar these days. What’s more, cigars are encouraged, not banned, in my man cave.

But the real kicker is the atmosphere. I don’t know about you, but whether I’m catching up with old friends or goofing off with new ones, I enjoy not having to ask them to repeat themselves ad nauseum. My man cave not only features great music that I enjoy, but played at an enjoyable volume.

So you can keep your aggro patronage, your overpriced drinks, and your cigarette deck. I think I’ll stick with hanging out in my man cave with great company, music I enjoy, a selection of beers and liquors tailored to my liking, and all the cigars I feel like smoking.

Hayward Tenney

Author:

When he's not busy writing, editing, smoking cigars, or raising his many, many children, Hayward "It's Lou, not Hayward" Tenney spends his days combating confusion about his real name (it's Hayward, but please - call him "Lou") and mourning the matrimonially-induced loss of his moustache (what's he gonna do with all that moustache wax he made?).

how to smoke a cigar

It doesn’t take much to learn how to smoke a cigar! You can be a pro just like Gary!

So you’ve just purchased your first premium handmade cigars. Congratulations. Now what do you do? Smoke them, of course! But there’s more to smoking cigars than clipping, lighting-up and puffing. Some cigar smokers tend to approach it as if it were an art, but although there are several steps involved, how to smoke cigars is really very simple.

While cigar smoking is the kind of hobby that even the most experienced enthusiasts will continue to learn even after many years, it’s not as difficult as it looks to get started. How to smoke a cigar is actually a very easy thing to learn, requiring just a few steps before the uninitiated newbie is puffing away like a pro. It can be intimidating for a new smoker to light up in the presence of BOTLs or SOTLs with lots of experience, which is why we’ve put together this handy guide so you can have a clue what you’re doing before you fire one up for the first time. However, don’t worry if you forget a step! Those savvy vets you’re smoking around are most likely extremely friendly, non-judgmental, and more than happy to help you enjoy your early cigar experiences. The vast majority of cigar smokers take great amounts of pleasure in sharing their passion and helping others, so if you’re not sure how to smoke a cigar properly – just ask a friend who knows! Continue reading

Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.