Tagged: cigar


cao brazilia cigar review

Jonathan Detore gives his CAO Brazilia cigar review

I’m so pumped to give the CAO Brazilia cigar review. This week’s round of reviews were drawn from a hat, and I think I won the draw. Of course maybe I just think that because this is one of my all-time favorite cigars. I mean just look at the thing – beautiful dark Arapiraca wrapper, covered in oil, aged a little bit. CAO Brazilia cigars are right in my wheelhouse, and I’ve smoked more than my fair share.

However, I feel it necessary to educate you fine consumers of cigars on the risks an oily wrapper may have. Because this cigar looks like it was dipped in a jug of 5W-30 motor oil, you can expect it to burn a little slower than usual. Sure, it offers amazing flavor and you don’t want to let the oils dry out because the result would be a bland, flaky, cracked piece of garbage. But because oils can build up more heavily in random spots on the cigar if it starts to dry out a bit, it can cause a slower burn in those areas that retain more oil while the rest burn at a consistent rate. This can obviously cause burn issues. Continue reading

Jonathan DeTore

Author:

My job here is pretty simple - I write stuff, I post stuff to Facebook, and I take it to the house consistently at the weekly slam drunk contest. I do it all while sipping on a fine glass of cognac at my desk (don’t tell my boss), and wearing cashmere slippers. Let’s just say "The Hef" has nothing on me.

how to cut a torpedo cigar

Gary Korb teaches readers how to cut a torpedo cigar in today’s informative blog post.

So, you’re ready to smoke your first Torpedo cigar. Congratulations! You’ve moved up to one of the big boys, but you’re not entirely sure how to cut a Torpedo cigar it because the head is rolled to a point. Cigars of this type are categorized in cigar speak as “figurados,” which also includes Belicosos, Pyramids and the like. They’re rolled in this bottle-neck style so the smoke is more concentrated, and therefore, richer in flavor when it hits your palate. But don’t let that pointy little head intimidate you. It can be cut just like a round or flathead cigar. The main difference is how you cut it and the type of cigar cutter you use. Continue reading

Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

history of gurkha cigars

The history of Gurkha cigars shows off a rich tradition of making high-end premium cigars

If you’ve smoked cigars for more than a week, chances are you’ve heard about Gurkha Cigars in the cigar lounge. Gurkha specializes mainly in high-end premium cigars the likes of which are bought by the most affluent of Maharaja presiding over his kingdom, yet Gurkha also offers lines for the every day smoker that are out-of-this-world incredible for the price. But there’s always a story behind a name, and that’s where your resident smarty-pants (me) comes in. Behold the history of Gurkha Cigars! Continue reading

Jonathan DeTore

Author:

My job here is pretty simple - I write stuff, I post stuff to Facebook, and I take it to the house consistently at the weekly slam drunk contest. I do it all while sipping on a fine glass of cognac at my desk (don’t tell my boss), and wearing cashmere slippers. Let’s just say "The Hef" has nothing on me.

my father cigar review

Gary Korb gives readers his My Father cigar review and his expert opinion on this premium cigar.

Introduced in 2008, My Father Cigars are blended and handcrafted by Jaime Garcia, son of the now-legendary Don José “Pepin” Garcia. Made at the My Father factory in Estelí, Nicaragua, the tobaccos used for these cigars are grown on their own farms and rolled in the finest Habano-Rosado Criollo-seed wrappers. Cigars made at the My Father factory in Estelí tend to have a reputation that precedes them, so you expect an excellent cigar, and the My Father edition is no exception. I was pleased to have the opportunity to write up this My Father cigar review, and take a real analytical look at this terrific cigars. It’s no wonder these smokes have exploded in popularity since coming onto the market, winning over all different types of smokers. The My Father Cigar Factory even took home the #1 Cigar of the Year award for 2012 for their outstanding Flor de last Antillas cigar. Alright, enough about the factory and the reputation, let’s get to the review! Continue reading

Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

rafael nodal cuban cigars

Rafael Nodal’s company Boutique Blends cigars made the Aging Room Quattro, a fine boutique cigar and the #1 Cigar of the Year for 2013 available in the USA.

Boutique cigars are one of the hottest trends going in the world of cigars today. If you need more proof, check the 2013 Top 25 Cigars of the Year List – if you eliminate cigars you can’t score legally in the USA, you’ll find the Aging Room Quattro at the top of the list. What company makes the Aging Room you ask? Rafael Nodal’s cigar company, the aptly named Boutique Blends. But what makes a boutique cigar a boutique cigar? Simple. It’s…um, yeah.

Well, if you consult a dictionary, you’ll get this: “…of, designating, or characteristic of a small, exclusive producer or business: one of California’s best boutique wineries.”

Obviously, for our purposes, we’re replacing the word “wineries” with “cigars” (or should it be manufacturers? More on that in a minute) – but when we define “boutique” – should we be doing it in terms of numbers, such as output of bottles (or cigars)? Or is it in availability of supplies, as in “small batch?” Is it the size of the manufacturer that matters?

Yes. And no. Continue reading

John Pullo

Author:

This is not his picture, nor does John even have a beard. Interestingly, his Social Security number is all ones. All we can say is "You will know him by the mullet he wears."

macanudo ascot cigar review

Tommy Zman’s Macanudo Ascot cigar review provides a look at this wildly popular cigar.

Mild, small cigars… okay, you might be thinking that they’re not for everyone, but I’ll go on record saying, yeah, I think they are. Hence, the Macanudo Ascot.

When I took a trip to the General Cigar factory in Santiago in the Dominican Republic, there were just gazillions of premium hand rolled cigars everywhere. I not only had my pick of the litter of tasty treats to choose from, but so did the thousands of people working there. But what took me by great surprise is that so many of the employees were smoking the Macanudo Ascot. In fact, the guy who was enjoying them the most was then, CEO of the company, Daniel Núñez. Continue reading

Tommy ZMan

Author:

Tommy ZMan is an obsessive enjoyer of life’s leafy pleasures. Growing up in the bowels of northern New Jersey, parented by an eccentric Polish father and a neurotic Italian mother, what else could this man possibly be other than a humorist? ZMan’s a real throwback to a time when men were kings of the castle and smoking a cigar in public didn’t label you an outcast and a pariah. He’s an old–school down to earth guy - but when it comes to p.c. tyranny and nanny-state legislature, he’ll draw his sword and swing for the fences. Tommy gathered a faithful following as a longtime feature writer at Cigar Magazine, and his testosterone laden FaceBook community, CROMAG NATION™ is truly the last great bastion for Men’s Men.

antonio y cleopatra cigar review

Jonathan DeTore gives his Antonio y Cleopatra Grenadier cigar review

I wanted to go back to my cigar smoking roots so I could do an Antonio y Cleopatra Grenadier cigar review, and no- I’m not talking about my college days at Groovy UV. Antonio y Cleopatra cigars have a certain… let’s say stigma about them. If you were ever rebellious or live in Colorado or Washington State, you know what I’m talking about. For those that don’t (most likely my mom and dad), don’t worry about it. But what’s terrible about this stigma is that we break away from how popular these cigars really are and what they offer. Continue reading

Jonathan DeTore

Author:

My job here is pretty simple - I write stuff, I post stuff to Facebook, and I take it to the house consistently at the weekly slam drunk contest. I do it all while sipping on a fine glass of cognac at my desk (don’t tell my boss), and wearing cashmere slippers. Let’s just say "The Hef" has nothing on me.

buying cigars online

Famous Smoke Shop offers both a world-class B&M cigar lounge as well as an industry-leading online retail site.

Buying cigars online is the more common means for purchasing premium cigars, rather than buying them at your neighborhood brick & mortar tobacco store. Some cigar smokers buy exclusively online for price, selection, and convenience, while others prefer the experience of a store where they can see the product “in-person.” Then there are those who buy their cigars both online and at their local tobacconist. Let’s take a look at the advantages and disadvantages to both. Continue reading

Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

arturo fuente cigar review

Cigar expert Gary Korb provides his Arturo Fuente cigar review

Introduction

Arturo Fuente cigars are one of the most iconic and well-known brands around. Even non-cigar smokers known that when you say “Arturo Fuente”, you’re talking about a top-notch premium cigar. Today I’ll be providing my Arturo Fuente cigar review, and for the task I’ve selected the Chateau Fuente Natural vitola from the line as it is a personal favorite of mine. Arturo Fuente Chateau Fuente cigars in the natural wrappers are identified by gold, red and green bands (as found on the Grand Reserva selections), and Spanish cedar sleeves with a green silk ribbon at the base. The cigars are rolled in Connecticut wrappers with a core blend of vintage Dominican long-filler from the company’s private reserve, and as you would expect from Fuente, the construction is first-rate. Offered in the following shapes, Chateau Fuente (4½” x 50), Pyramid (6″ x 52 with a red silk band), Double Chateau (6¾” x 50), and Royal Salute (7 5/8″ x 54), for this review I smoked the Rothschild-size Chateau Fuente. Continue reading

Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

cigar girl

In the Roaring 20′s and on into the post-prohibition days of the 1930s, cigar girls were a common site roaming nightclubs and bard

Our History of the Cigar Girl begins in pre-war America, during the Roaring Twenties. It was an Era during which America enjoyed considerable prosperity, particularly in her urban centers.

Fueled by this newfound wealth, entrepreneurial restaurateurs began to expand their establishments from pure eateries to “supper clubs,” a destination where patrons could spend an entire evening eating, drinking (despite the prohibition of alcohol), socializing, and listening to live music. Continue reading

Hayward Tenney

Author:

When he's not busy writing, editing, smoking cigars, or raising his many, many children, Hayward "It's Lou, not Hayward" Tenney spends his days combating confusion about his real name (it's Hayward, but please - call him "Lou") and mourning the matrimonially-induced loss of his moustache (what's he gonna do with all that moustache wax he made?).