Tagged: Gary Korb


my father cigar review

Gary Korb gives readers his My Father cigar review and his expert opinion on this premium cigar.

Introduced in 2008, My Father Cigars are blended and handcrafted by Jaime Garcia, son of the now-legendary Don José “Pepin” Garcia. Made at the My Father factory in Estelí, Nicaragua, the tobaccos used for these cigars are grown on their own farms and rolled in the finest Habano-Rosado Criollo-seed wrappers. Cigars made at the My Father factory in Estelí tend to have a reputation that precedes them, so you expect an excellent cigar, and the My Father edition is no exception. I was pleased to have the opportunity to write up this My Father cigar review, and take a real analytical look at this terrific cigars. It’s no wonder these smokes have exploded in popularity since coming onto the market, winning over all different types of smokers. The My Father Cigar Factory even took home the #1 Cigar of the Year award for 2012 for their outstanding Flor de last Antillas cigar. Alright, enough about the factory and the reputation, let’s get to the review! Continue reading

Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

arturo fuente cigar review

Cigar expert Gary Korb provides his Arturo Fuente cigar review

Introduction

Arturo Fuente cigars are one of the most iconic and well-known brands around. Even non-cigar smokers known that when you say “Arturo Fuente”, you’re talking about a top-notch premium cigar. Today I’ll be providing my Arturo Fuente cigar review, and for the task I’ve selected the Chateau Fuente Natural vitola from the line as it is a personal favorite of mine. Arturo Fuente Chateau Fuente cigars in the natural wrappers are identified by gold, red and green bands (as found on the Grand Reserva selections), and Spanish cedar sleeves with a green silk ribbon at the base. The cigars are rolled in Connecticut wrappers with a core blend of vintage Dominican long-filler from the company’s private reserve, and as you would expect from Fuente, the construction is first-rate. Offered in the following shapes, Chateau Fuente (4½” x 50), Pyramid (6″ x 52 with a red silk band), Double Chateau (6¾” x 50), and Royal Salute (7 5/8″ x 54), for this review I smoked the Rothschild-size Chateau Fuente. Continue reading

Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

Introduction and Initial Impressions

cigars, cigar review, davidoff nicaragua cigar review

Gary Korb gives his Davidoff Nicaragua cigar review

Davidoff Nicaragua cigars are the first all-Nicaraguan leaf blend from the world’s most distinguished luxury-class cigar manufacturer. 10 years in the making, Davidoff’s blending sensei, Hendrik Kelner, has done it again. Offered in only three shapes, Toro (5½” x 54), Robusto (5″ x 50), and Short Robusto (3¾” x 46), the core blend consists of longfiller tobaccos from Estelí, Condega, Jalapa, and the rich volcanic soil of Ometepe, aged a minimum of eight years. On initial inspection, these puros boast shimmering, 10-year-aged Habano-seed wrappers cured to a uniform Rosado hue and impeccable construction. For example, not only is the rolling seamless, but feeling my way along the length of the cigars I noticed there were virtually no soft spots. Now it’s time for me to light this beautiful cigar up and provide all of you with my Davidoff Nicaragua cigar review! Continue reading

Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

Gary-Korb-CigarAdvisorOver the years, I’ve received many emails asking me about freezing cigars and whether it’s OK to store cigars in the freezer or the refrigerator. Let’s start with the latter. NO WAY JOSÉ! True, refrigerators are made to keep foods fresh, but even though cigars are somewhat related to veggies by their nature, the humidity in the fridge is much too low to keep the leaves moist, and your cigars will eventually dry out.

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Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

Gary KorbNot too long ago, I wrote an article for CigarAdvisor.com about how I used an ordinary household condiment to repair a wrapper that was unfurling on my cigar. The way it happened was, I had mistakenly clipped the cap of my cigar a bit too low. I’ve seen some guys chop their cigars below the shoulders and the wrappers have remained intact. However, more often than not, over-cutting the cap will result in unraveling of the wrapper leaf, which is what happened in my case. Even more annoying is when this happens to a really fine (and not to mention, pricey), cigar. Continue reading

Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

Gary KorbCigar tunneling, a circumstance in which a cigar’s wrapper leaf doesn’t burn, causing a cave-like formation in the foot of the cigar, can be caused by several factors:   The purpose of the binder leaf is to help all of the tobaccos burn at approximately the same rate. Therefore, if the wrapper is too moist, too thick, or too oily, it may not burn at the same rate as the filler and binder. (Maduro and Oscuro wrappers tend to be much oilier than most shade grown and other “natural” wrapper leaves.)

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Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

Gary KorbThere are many different tricks and theories on how to light a cigar. I wanted to share one of my favorite tips that will help you get the most from your smoke. When toasting your cigars, etiquette dictates that you’re not supposed to let the flame touch the tobacco at the foot. Rather, the flame should be held close enough to the tobacco to get the foot glowing without it catching fire. Once you see red (so to speak), gently blow on the foot until the entire surface is glowing all the way out to the last ring.

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Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

Gary KorbHave you ever noticed how many things are seasonal? Fruits and veggies, sports, ice fishing – even beers are seasonal. You might opt for an IPA or a refreshing pale ale during the summer, and a Porter or Stout during the winter. Could the same be said for premium cigars? Why not?

Using the beer example above, bolder cigars would be smoked during the late fall and winter months, while lighter-bodied cigars would be smoked during the late spring and summer. As always, it’s a matter of personal preference. So what cigars are best for smoking during different times of the year? To tell the truth, I’ve never thought about it all that much; I just smoke whatever I feel like regardless of the season. Moreover, I would guess most cigar smokers have a similar routine. Then again, there are cigar smokers who like to change things up every now and then; if not seasonally, then perhaps for a couple of weeks to a month. I tend to move back and forth from full-bodied to milder cigars. Yet, this is something I do year-round, so it’s not “seasonal” in my case.

For the sake of argument, let’s say that most cigar smokers do smoke milder cigars in the Spring/Summer months and robust cigars in the Fall/Winter months. Here’s the logic: again, going back to the seasonal beer example, during the summer, you tend to smoke more cigars. Therefore, one might prefer to smoke more mild cigars than full-bodied smokes, whereas during the winter months, one might prefer a stronger cigar. Why? It all comes down to the amount of nicotine one can handle, or for that matter, prefer. Generally speaking, smoking one or two full-bodied cigars in a sitting during the winter, would be equivalent to smoking four to five mild-to-medium-bodied cigars in the summer.

Then what about those who live in states like Florida, Arizona, or southern California? It would be unfair to assume that cigar smokers in those parts of the country are smoking mild and medium-bodied cigars year-round, because it’s not true. I think this “seasonal cigar” theory may apply more to occasional cigar smokers like those who smoke a few cigars a week. True-blue cigar smokers smoke cigars of every strength, and I think it’s fair to assume in their case, that they smoke whatever they like depending on their mood. After all, you’re always going to have cigar smokers who prefer mild and medium-bodied cigars year-round, while the same can be said for those who prefer the hard-core, headier cigars, regardless of their locale.

If you think there is any validity to this theory (or not),
or this is something that you practice, please be sure to leave a comment. In the meantime, I think I’ll do a survey about this on CigarAdvisor.com and find out what the real deal is.

Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

After taking the cigar world by storm several years ago with the introduction of two unprecedented “firsts” for premium cigars, Sam Leccia has struck out on his own with a new line of cigars produced and distributed through his new, aptly-named Sam Leccia Cigar Company.

 


Sam Leccia Cigar Co.

Sam Leccia

Sam Leccia has left Oliva Cigar Co to start his own company.

Gary Korb: What was the first cigar you ever smoked, and what do you remember most about it?

Sam Leccia:. I actually remember my first cigar quite well. I was in 10th grade. Me and my two buddies, Vince and Tom, pitched-in and bought a box of Phillies blunts. I can remember opening that box when we got home. I had cigar boxes around the house with baseball cards and matchbox cars in them; this was the first one that I had with actual cigars in it. We were so pumped to smoke them. Then we got into other cigars, like hand-rolled cigars. I remember my first hand rolled. It was a Macanudo and I spent $6.00 on it, which on a 15 year-old’s budget was insane, but I felt like I was on top of the world smoking it. I used to always go into the cigar store at the local mall just to enjoy the aromas of the walk-in humidor. I was hooked. The funny thing is, growing up my Dad always insisted that I didn’t smoke or drink, and yet my career has been both in the liquor and now tobacco industry. Sorry Dad.

GK: How did you decide on the name “Debut” for your first release?

Sam: Names are not easy to come up with, and usually are more important to the company using it rather than everyone else. I gave a lot of thought to various names. Some I will probably use down the road, but this is my first solo release, so what better than Debut?

GK: Where is your company and factory based?

Sam: My company is based in Pittsburgh, Pa, still out of my garage, but the factory that’s making Debut is in Honduras.

GK: Can you give us some background about the tobaccos used in Debut blend and how you developed it; for instance, when you knew it was ready, etc.?

Sam: I am excited about the blend. It’s the most fun of the entire process. The blend consists of tobaccos from Honduras, Nicaragua, Ecuador and Santo Domingo. The wrapper ages well and the oils really rise to the surface after some aging. I love a good oily wrapper, and this truly delivers beyond my expectations. As far as ‘when I knew it was ready,’ just like finding your soul mate, you know when you know.

GK: Why did you decide to go with 60 gauge ring sizes for two of the three Debut frontmarks?

Sam: Well it’s no secret that I like a 60 ring. I wanted to put my twist on traditional sizes. I didn’t want to come up with some new name for a size, I like the length of both the Robusto and Churchill, I just gave them more tobacco. Though, the figurado is a traditional 6 ½ X 52 Torpedo.

GK: How much of a part will social media sites like Facebook and Twitter play in marketing your cigars?

Sam: I enjoy Facebook and Twitter. I have reconnected with so many people: old Navy buddies, school friends, and I can stay in touch with people I meet in my travels. I don’t really build a strategy around using Facebook or Twitter, rather, I just use it like everyone else does to update my friends on my life. It just so happens my life is cigars, so it turns into to some form of marketing, but that’s not truly why I use it.

GK: The cigars that brought you to prominence were true “firsts.” Does the Sam Leccia Cigar Company have plans for producing something just as unique in the future?

Sam: You know, I look at things differently now. I am different. I am a nonconformist by nature. I like to try new things and have fun. The goal is to just bring some excitement to an industry that I am excited about being in. I could easily make traditional blends in traditional sizes but that’s just not who I am. I honor tradition by creating new cigars. I have lots up my sleeve.

GK: Since going rogue, what has been the most surprising thing that has happened?

Sam: Your question makes me sound like some kind of Sarah Palin (laughs),
but the answer is, I enjoy the freedom. It’s liberating.

GK: What do cigar smokers seem to misunderstand about you?

Sam: I can probably write a book based on this question alone. Some people expect me to be a 6-foot 6-inch hard-ass, but I’m a soft spoken, 5-foot 7-inch regular Joe. I’m a creative thinker and I’m kind and generous. I certainly don’t think of myself as any sort of ‘celebrity.’ I say this all the time but, I have no paparazzi on my lawn; no one bothers me in grocery stores or the mall; and I highly doubt anyone tells Kid Rock that he “looks like Sam Leccia”. I’m as real as it gets and I enjoy meeting and hanging out with the cigar smoking nation.

GK: Will you be introducing Debut at the upcoming IPCPR show in Las Vegas this summer and doing other major cigar events?

Sam: I am currently taking pre-orders and plan to start shipping before the show. I’m in kind of a difficult situation, as my first run looks to have already been pre-sold. I know that sounds like a good thing, but I want to meet the demand without sacrificing quality. I will be at the IPCPR, and I can’t wait to hit the road and reconnect with all of my cigar smoking friends.

GK: I heard that you are not using a traditional wood box for your cigars. How will they be packaged?

Sam: I am using a box made from thick chipboard. It is made from 100% recycled materials and manufactured here in the USA. I don’t profess to be ‘green’ but I can sleep better at night knowing that I am not responsible for one tree cut down in the rain forest to make my boxes. Central America’s rain forests are being depleted; I am proud not to have a hand in that. I’m very excited about the boxes; they look amazing and I hope others follow suit.

GK: If you could compare yours cigars to one of your favorite bands, which would it be, and why?

Sam: Wow. That’s a tough question. I love music to no end – I am an amateur singer and lyricist, but to compare what I do to any of the music and bands that I love, I just can’t do it.

 


 

Contact info
Pre-orders and general inquiries about the Sam Leccia Cigar Company: SamsDebut@SamLecciaCigarCo.com

Links
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/sam.leccia
Website: http://www.samlecciacigarco.com

Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.