Tagged: value cigars


padron cigar review

Lou provides readers with his Padron cigar review

Padron cigars are one of those magical brands that pretty much every smoker loves or wants to try. It’s not hard to see why, because for decades Padron cigars have included some of the best, tastiest, and highest rated cigars available anywhere.

They owe their success largely to two things. First is a fanatical dedication to quality: they could easily grow bigger to meet demand, but refuse to do so if it means the quality of their cigars would be compromised. The second is their being “vertically integrated,” a fancy corporate word that really just means that they control their entire supply line. So all of the tobacco used to make Padron cigars is grown, harvested, cured, fermented, and aged by Padron in Nicaragua.

Today I’ll be smoking and giving my Padron cigar review cigar from their core line, often referred to as the “thousands series.” Continue reading

Hayward Tenney

Author:

When he's not busy writing, editing, smoking cigars, or raising his many, many children, Hayward "It's Lou, not Hayward" Tenney spends his days combating confusion about his real name (it's Hayward, but please - call him "Lou") and mourning the matrimonially-induced loss of his moustache (what's he gonna do with all that moustache wax he made?).

Gary KorbI recently received the following email from Cliff, one of our CigarAdvisor.com readers who writes to me pretty often, usually with a question or a comment about cigars. He had seen the newsletters in which we offered “blind” samplers.

The first blind sampler had 4 cigars, all the same cigar, without their bands. You had to guess the blender. The second blind sampler had 5 different cigars, all top-flight luxury cigars, except you didn’t know what you were buying until you opened the package and saw the bands, which were left out of the photo. For some reason this compelled him to write to me about bundle cigars, so here goes… Continue reading

Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

Gary Korb talks Bundle CigarsIn September of 2010 I wrote an article on aging Seconds and Bundle cigars. As I was writing that piece I went off on a tangent I began to write about some of the misconceptions about bundles. Realizing I had the makings of a follow-up article, I saved my notes.

Misconception #1: “All bundle cigars are seconds.”

Wrong. Not all, but a lot of bundle cigars are “seconds,” and there are a number of reasons for this. For one, many bundles consist of cigars rolled by apprentice torcedors. After all, what would you expect from a trainee? But even experienced torcedors can produce cigars that draw poorly, are rolled too tight, too loose, or have bunching issues. In some cases, the wrappers may be too veiny or unevenly matched in color; the cigars could have plugs, etc.; all things that usually don’t pass “first” quality level inspection. So, these cigars are sold as “seconds,” which is also why they’re much lower in price.

bundle cigars

Gary’s go-to bundle cigars – the Flor de Oliva

Alternately, many bundles are made specifically as “firsts.” One of the best examples I can think of are my all-time “go-to” everyday cigars, Flor de Oliva. As the “bread ‘n butter” line for Oliva Cigars, they can’t afford to make “cheapo” cigars, nor would they ever consider it.

Moreover, many of the top-tier factories produce bundled “firsts” if for no other reason than to cut costs. (Remember, you also pay for the box.) Other good examples of bundled firsts are La Floridita, GH2 by Gran Habano, Siboney by Alec Bradley and Occidental (also from Alec Bradley),
Imperial, and of course the Famous “Value Line” and “Thousands” series cigars.

Misconception #2: “Bundle cigars taste bad.”

Well, a lot of boxed cigars taste bad, too. I think this comes from the idea that the tobaccos used in bundle cigars are of lower grade. Most of the bundles, especially those from the better factories, contain the same filler tobaccos used in the higher-priced boxed brands. No doubt, there are manufacturers who will use lower grade tobacco for filler, but the farms don’t have specific tobacco fields for bundle cigars and others for boxed cigars. As the tobacco is sorted, the factory supervisor decides which leaves are used for each blend. All of the tobacco is eventually used regardless of the length of the leaf. For example, one of the better “mixed-filler” bundles (long, medium and short filler) are the Flor De Gonzalez Bundles.

No doubt, there are plenty of toss-away bundle sticks made with low-grade ingredients, but a lot of bundles are also surprisingly tasty. Moreover, seconds of already popular brands should taste as good as the original, even if they’re not as pretty.

Misconception #3: “Bundles are not premium cigars.”

Almost all bundles are “premium cigars” by definition. Unless the cigars are entirely machine-made, hand-bunched and rolled cigars are considered “premiums” even if it doesn’t say “hecho a mano” on the package.

In some circles, “seconds” are not considered premiums. But like anything else, some seconds are better than others, too. Good examples of these are the Rocky Patel Seconds, Factory Selects, and Originals. Technically they’re seconds, but mostly due to imperfections in the wrappers, not necessarily because of construction. And since these cigars are seconds of some of Rocky’s bestselling high-priced cigars, they are premiums in every way. Supervisor Selection is another great “seconds” buy since it is identical to another highly popular Alec Bradley mainline edition.

Misconception #4: “Bundles are only for middle-class cigar buyers.”

Class warfare has no place with regard to what a given cigar smoker prefers to put to their lips. To each his own, as they say. There are plenty of upmarket and luxury cigar smokers who buy bundles for any number of reasons; from being able to smoke a decent cigar when a high-priced stick is not in order, for handing out to friends, smoking on the golf course, etc.

The reverse is also true. By buying bundles, a lot of so-called “middle class” cigar smokers usually save enough money to pick up a box of a high-priced box brand they want for those special occasions. By the way, there are plenty of cigar smokers who are so loyal to their bundle brands they’d just as soon pass on a box of anything else.

Finally, and this is not a misconception, bundle cigars can serve as an economical introduction to many a brand’s premium cigars. As mentioned above, popular brand seconds will give you a good, yet cost-effective taste of what you can expect, not only from the boxed version, but the overall quality of the manufacturer. If they make a good bundle cigar, chances are other cigars in their stable will be good as well.

Author:

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.