How to Re-Hydrate Stale Cigars: Part 2

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In my previous blog, How to re-hydrate stale cigars, I spoke more to the issue of whether stale or dried-out cigars can be re-humidified. In this column, I will explain the actual “how-to” of proper re-hydration for both loose and boxed cigars.

Loose cigars

Re-hydrating cigars is a procedure that requires a lot of patience. The idea is to allow slow absorption of moisture. You don’t want to “shock” your dry cigars with too much moisture at once. They can actually swell and even split, which is the last thing you want to do, especially if some of them are expensivos.

  1. Place them in a humidor or a sealed container with a humidifier that isn’t fully charged. It helps to have a digital hygrometer / thermometer in there as well, so you can keep better tabs on the amount of RH your cigars are getting. Give them a few days to absorb what little moisture remains in the humidifier. Check the humidifier to see if it’s just about dried-out. If so, move on to the next step.
  2. Next, add only a little distilled water and/or recharging solution to the humidifier – no more than one-third absorption – and let the cigars settle-in again for about a week, maybe two, depending on how well they’re coming back. Once they begin to feel less like sticks, move on to step 3.
  3. Fully re-charge humidifier and let your cigars continue to rest until they are re-humidified to your satisfaction. Rotating them every few days will help keep things even during the process, too.

If you’re re-hydrating your cigars in a very large or cabinet-style humidor, you should start by placing the cigars as far away from the humidifier as possible. Move them a little closer to the device about every 5-7 days.

Remember, this process can take several weeks to well over a month, or even longer, so, be patient.

Boxed cigars

If you keep your cigars in their factory boxes and notice they’re beginning to dry out, one of the simplest methods is to place the entire box inside a plastic zip-type bag. Don’t completely seal the bag; leave it open about one-half-inch, because you want a little air to get in there. Plus, it will help trap any moisture still left in the cigars. Placing a clean piece of sponge dampened with distilled water or 50/50 solution in the bag will help. Or, in lieu of a piece of sponge, you can add a Boveda 69% humidity pack. As noted above, the idea here again is slow absorption of moisture.

Rotate the cigars every few days from the bottom to the top of the box. Keep this up until you’re satisfied with their suppleness. After that, you can place the Boveda pack inside the box, and it probably wouldn’t hurt to pick up a box of Boveda packs to prevent this from happening again, or in the first place.

Remember, as I pointed-out in my prior column, when cigars lose too much moisture they also lose a lot of their bouquet, so, unless you nip it in the bud, don’t expect them to be as flavorful. Finally, regardless of their condition, never resort to drastic measures to revive your cigars or you’ll ruin them permanently.

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John Pullo

John Pullo

Managing Editor at CigarAdvisor.com

This is not his picture, nor does John even have a beard. Interestingly, his Social Security number is all ones. All we can say is " "You will know him by the mullet he wears." "

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