Cigar Bars Offer the Best of Both Worlds cacover

Cigar Bars Offer the Best of Both Worlds

Cigar bars are unique places that allow you to enjoy both a premium cigar and an adult beverage at the same time, in spite of widening smoking bans.
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How Loose Wrappers Cause Bad Burning Cigars cacover

How Loose Wrappers Cause Bad Burning Cigars

The subtle nuances of cigar construction can have a serious impact on the quality of the burn and smoke. This post explains how and why in detail.
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Nubbing Your Cigars With A Little Help cacover

Nubbing Your Cigars With A Little Help

There are many different tips on how to smoke a cigar. Today, Gary provides some pointers on smoking your cigars all the way down to the last puff.
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Famous Smoke Shop Debuts New Retail Store cacover

Famous Smoke Shop Debuts New Retail Store

Famous Smoke Shop has opened the doors to their new, state-of-the-art cigar store. Learn all about the best place in Pennsylvania to buy premium cigars!
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How to Avoid “Torch Flame Overkill” cacover

How to Avoid “Torch Flame Overkill”

Torch lighters are the preferred tool of many smokers to light their cigars. Learn how to properly use this tool to light a cigar without flame overkill.
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What’s On Your Cigar Bucket List? cacover

What’s On Your Cigar Bucket List?

Reading Time: 2 minutes A few days ago, while admiring the cigars along the Famous Smoke Shop retail store shelves, a colleague of mine said, “There are just too many cigars.”

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Can A Cigar’s Flavor Vary By Its Wrapper Color? cacover

Can A Cigar’s Flavor Vary By Its Wrapper Color?

Reading Time: 2 minutes Depending on the color of the wrappers on your cigars, their character can shift from a small to even a significant amount of flavor.

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Will My Cigars Arrive Fresh? cacover

Will My Cigars Arrive Fresh?

Having fresh cigars is essential to the smoking experience. Many smokers who order cigars online worry about keeping the cigars fresh during shipping.
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Alabao – At Your Own Risk cacover

Alabao – At Your Own Risk

Perdomo Alabao flavor characteristics are creamy, mild spices, well-balanced, nutty flavors with notes of coffee and cocoa on the finish.
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cigars and Country Of Origin

Cigars and Country of Origin

Reading Time: 2 minutes

There used to be a “guideline” of sorts when it came to defining what types of cigars were produced in their respective countries of origin. For example, Dominican and Mexican-made cigars were generally considered milder in flavor, whereas Honduran and Nicaraguan cigars were considered stronger in flavor. No doubt, tobaccos grown in the latter countries, especially Nicaragua, tend to have a naturally fuller flavor, and that is one of the reasons Nicaraguan tobacco is often added to a blend to give a little more power.

Today, with manufacturers in all of the cigar-producing nations using a variety of tobaccos in many of their blends, the country of origin is not as important to cigar smokers as it once was. Ironically, Fuente Fuente Opus X cigars, which are made with an all-Dominican-grown leaf blend, are among the fullest-bodied cigars. So, it’s not necessarily the country of origin that defines a cigar’s strength, but the leaves and how they’re cured.

With regard to the “style” of a cigar, country of origin does play a role. For example, Cuban “style” cigars are made with all Cuban-grown tobacco, which has its own distinctive flavor. Therefore, the all-Dominican-leaf Opus X cited above could be considered “Cuban style.” The term used for cigars made with leaves all from one country is puro, pronounced “poo-ROW?.” And as you would expect, there are Dominican, Honduran, and Nicaraguan puros.

Generally speaking though, these days cigar smokers tend to be less concerned with a cigar’s style or country of origin, and more concerned with quality and flavor. This is one of the reasons most cigar manufacturers use tobaccos from a variety of countries in their cigars. These countries are not limited to The DR, Honduras, Nicaragua, Mexico, Indonesia (Sumatra) and the U.S. (Connecticut Shade & Broadleaf) either; manufacturers often use tobaccos grown in Ecuador, Brazil, Colombia, Peru, and in the case of CAO’s “Italia” selection, Italy, as well. Or, take the Drew Estate “Natural” selection, which also uses tobaccos from Italy, Spain and Turkey.

Moreover, there are cigars made in Honduras with only Nicaraguan-grown leaf. Would that be a Nicaraguan puro even though it was made in Honduras? Technically speaking, yes, but that example, plus the others cited above, says that country of origin is insignificant, or at least, secondary.

In a business where Cuban puros were once the rage (and in many corners still are),
it’s refreshing to know that with manufacturers using a variety of tobaccos in their cigars, cigar smokers have a virtually endless supply of taste experiences available to them.

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