“Help! I’m a fast smoker.”

Q. I find that I smoke cigars fast, I seem to puff on them rather hard and fast. I can smoke one much faster then my roommate can smoke an identical one.

WhatI find is that my cigar starts turning acidy much faster. Aside from slowing my style down, I was wondering if there is any other suggestions you can make.


Tim K.

A. I’d bet that you are either still also smoking cigarettes, or have recently moved from cigarettes to cigars, right?

Either way, the solution you proposed in your own message is the right one. SLOW DOWN.

I once read an article in Cigar Aficionado by Marvin Shanken, the magazine’s publisher, in which he wrote that he puffs on his cigar only about once a minute. It makes sense, too. I often refer to letting the cigar “smoke itself” between puffs. That’s because part of the cigar smoking “experience” is also being able to appreciate the cigar’s aroma. Taking fewer puffs can also make a stronger cigar more manageable.

One other thing: If you’re puffing on your cigar as you light it, I would suggest you don’t. You may be pulling on it too hard, which can cause it to burn bitter, not to mention possibly scorching the wrapper, which will also affect the flavor.  Here is the proper way to toast (a/k/a “light”) a cigar:

Get yourself a decent torch-flame lighter. Toast the foot of the cigar from the edges inward as you rotate the cigar. Make sure the flame is not touching the tobacco; just close enough to get it glowing. Gently blow on the foot to get it glowing even more. Continue to toast the cigar in this manner until it is glowing evenly across the foot. Now your cigar is ready to smoke, and it should taste better, too.

Good luck, and let me know how it works out.

Gary Korb

Gary Korb

Executive Editor at cigaradvisor.com

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

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