Cigars 101

How to Repair Cigars with Peeling and Cracked Wrappers

Reading Time: 3 minutes

It happens. You reach into your humidor for that great cigar you’ve been looking forward to all day and you notice the wrapper is starting to peel away from the roll. If you light-up, the peel will only get worse. So what can you do? Using saliva seems like a practical solution, but rarely, if ever, works. Some cigar smokers also resort to using bee’s wax-based lip balm, but there are no guarantees with that either because it never really dries.

Acacia helps fix cracked cigar wrappersUnraveling cigars are best fixed with acacia powder, better known as gum arabic, or vegetable gum. This is what cigar rollers use for preparing the wrapper leaf and cap when they roll cigars. Gum arabic, which can be found in the baking aisle at some supermarkets, spice shops, and online, comes in powdered form. When mixed with distilled water to the right consistency, it can be a real life saver, or to put it another way, a real cigar saver. It’s also odorless and colorless. Simply apply a modest amount of the liquefied gum to the wrapper and carefully “roll” the detached portion of wrapper leaf back into place.

Another product that can be used for repairing unraveling wrappers is Pectin. Pectin comes in both powder and liquid form, and you might already have some in the house. Normally used for canning jams and jellies, when applied carefully to the wrapper leaf as described above, you should get similar results.

What about cigars that are cracked in the middle or at the foot?

When a cigar is cracked in the middle, in some cases it may be minor, but any crack in a wrapper leaf, no matter how small, is going to leak smoke and may negatively affect the way the cigar draws and burns.

The best way to repair this type of crack is to take a small piece of wrapper leaf (it could come from a cigar stub of the same blend or another cigar with the same type of wrapper leaf),
and use it to “patch” the crack, not unlike the way you’d fix a blown tire.

First, cut a piece of wrapper leaf to the approximate size you need to completely cover the crack. Then lightly wet the piece of wrapper leaf with gum arabic solution, paste it over the trouble spot and let it dry. In the meantime, go get another cigar.

If the crack starts at the foot of the cigar, first see how far up the length of the cigar the crack goes. If it’s less than an inch you might be better off cutting the cigar as cleanly as possible just above the crack. The cigar will be shorter, but you might still be able to get a decent smoke out of it. If you go that route, make sure you use a really sharp and powerful double blade cigar cutter. If the body of the cigar fits comfortably in the hole and the cutter is very sharp, snap the cutter as quickly as possible for a clean cut. Sometimes you get a rough edge, but it’s better than tossing the cigar.

If you’d rather not take any chances, repeat the process described above for repairing a crack in the middle of a cigar.

Remember, if the wrapper is cracked and you don’t have gum arabic or pectin, there is very little you can do to repair it. By having a small jar of gum arabic in the house, at least you know there’s hope.

27 Comments
Oldest
Newest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Wes T. (mobarbq)
12 years ago

I have successfully used a small amount of real honey (not honey “sauce” like from KFC) smeared along the edge of the ravel, and then let it dry. It gives off a bit of a caramel smell when you later smoke the cigar. Maybe just another idea.

Cigar King
10 months ago

It works. Delicately repair with honey, and a moist paper towel for light clean up. Any stickyness is better than an unraveling cigar!

Wes T. (mobarbq)
12 years ago

I have successfully used a small amount of real honey (not honey “sauce” like from KFC) smeared along the edge of the ravel, and then let it dry. It gives off a bit of a caramel smell when you later smoke the cigar. Maybe just another idea.

Patrick Hughes
11 years ago

I have read that milk works.

Patrick Hughes
11 years ago

I have read that milk works.

Gary Korb
11 years ago

Hi Richard,
Actually, both overly dry and overly moist cigars can unravel, but a dry cigar is more likely to unfurl. And to totally confuse you, yes, sometimes a bad rolling job will cause a cigar to come apart. ;-)

Richard Kelly
11 years ago

Interesting but what causes the wrapper to detach and unfold like that? Is it because it is kept too dry or too humid or is it just a problem with the cigar itself?

Richard Kelly
11 years ago

Interesting but what causes the wrapper to detach and unfold like that? Is it because it is kept too dry or too humid or is it just a problem with the cigar itself?

Gary Korb
11 years ago

Hi Richard,
Actually, both overly dry and overly moist cigars can unravel, but a dry cigar is more likely to unfurl. And to totally confuse you, yes, sometimes a bad rolling job will cause a cigar to come apart. ;-)

Gary Korb
11 years ago

Hi Richard,
Actually, both overly dry and overly moist cigars can unravel, but a dry cigar is more likely to unfurl. And to totally confuse you, yes, sometimes a bad rolling job will cause a cigar to come apart. ;-)

Ken E.
10 years ago

Cool info, I have a very nice, aged cigar from a “south of Florida” Island that needs a repair. This tip wil surely help with that.

Ken E.
10 years ago

Cool info, I have a very nice, aged cigar from a “south of Florida” Island that needs a repair. This tip wil surely help with that.

Ken E.
10 years ago

Cool info, I have a very nice, aged cigar from a “south of Florida” Island that needs a repair. This tip wil surely help with that.

Adrian
10 years ago

Interesting, I will try this method and see how it comes out. I will also try the honey and milk that was posted in the comments.

Adrian
10 years ago

Interesting, I will try this method and see how it comes out. I will also try the honey and milk that was posted in the comments.

Byron
10 years ago

Gum Arabic is hard to find, and over-priced if you do — Hobby Lobby sells small bottles in the artist supplies dept. for $14.99. But there in the same store is Elmer’s School Glue. Not the white paste, but a clear, non-toxic product from China that seems identical to Gum Arabic, except very slightly thicker and lacking the yellowish color — and it’s five ounces for $2.50, enough for several lifetimes. If you doubt they’re the same thing, rub a little of each between your fingers and see for yourself.

Byron
10 years ago

Gum Arabic is hard to find, and over-priced if you do — Hobby Lobby sells small bottles in the artist supplies dept. for $14.99. But there in the same store is Elmer’s School Glue. Not the white paste, but a clear, non-toxic product from China that seems identical to Gum Arabic, except very slightly thicker and lacking the yellowish color — and it’s five ounces for $2.50, enough for several lifetimes. If you doubt they’re the same thing, rub a little of each between your fingers and see for yourself.

Leonard
9 years ago

Cracks on the mouth-end of cigars, I always repair using rolling paper.

Just ask your kid who smokes secretly for two rolling papers per cracked cigar, otherwise buy at wallmart ;). Then stick one rolling paper all the way around the cigar, just above the start of the crack. Then cut off the sticky part of the second rolling paper and apply to the open side of the first rolling paper, to seal it. When I smoke this repaired cigar I apply some lip-balm or vaseline to my lips to keep the rolling paper from sticking to my lips.

This method works perfectly for cracks at the mouth-end of the cigar, does not change the flavor and can be done with cheap supplies from any local shop.

Leonard
9 years ago

Cracks on the mouth-end of cigars, I always repair using rolling paper.

Just ask your kid who smokes secretly for two rolling papers per cracked cigar, otherwise buy at wallmart ;). Then stick one rolling paper all the way around the cigar, just above the start of the crack. Then cut off the sticky part of the second rolling paper and apply to the open side of the first rolling paper, to seal it. When I smoke this repaired cigar I apply some lip-balm or vaseline to my lips to keep the rolling paper from sticking to my lips.

This method works perfectly for cracks at the mouth-end of the cigar, does not change the flavor and can be done with cheap supplies from any local shop.

Leonard
9 years ago

Cracks on the mouth-end of cigars, I always repair using rolling paper.

Just ask your kid who smokes secretly for two rolling papers per cracked cigar, otherwise buy at wallmart ;). Then stick one rolling paper all the way around the cigar, just above the start of the crack. Then cut off the sticky part of the second rolling paper and apply to the open side of the first rolling paper, to seal it. When I smoke this repaired cigar I apply some lip-balm or vaseline to my lips to keep the rolling paper from sticking to my lips.

This method works perfectly for cracks at the mouth-end of the cigar, does not change the flavor and can be done with cheap supplies from any local shop.

Sam
9 years ago

@ Leonard. Great idea it saved my Cohiba!

Sam
9 years ago

@ Leonard. Great idea it saved my Cohiba!

Sam
9 years ago

@ Leonard. Great idea it saved my Cohiba!

Jeffrey D Pitman
3 years ago

There is a medical tape that is made from looks like thin cloth/paper. Tears real easy, not like that old tough cloth crap used to be popular. I wrap the tear with this paper tape all the way around the cigar then when I smoke to the tape, remove it and smoke down the rest. Works quite well.

Randolph
3 years ago

Google “Stogie Mechanic.” Worked for me.

How to Repair Cigars with Peeling and Cracked Wrappers | Craig's List
3 years ago

[…] Source: How to Repair Cigars with Peeling and Cracked Wrappers […]

My Homepage
2 years ago

… [Trackback]

[…] Find More Informations here: famous-smoke.com/cigaradvisor/how-to-repair-cigars-with-peeling-and-cracked-wrappers/trackback […]

John Pullo

John Pullo

Editor in Chief

This is not his picture, nor does he even have a beard. A solid 'B' student and occasional low-fi musician, John is a medley of cynicism and sarcasm crammed into a wrinkled Oxford shirt who makes it nearly intolerable to watch reality television with him in the same room. Interestingly, his Social Security number is all ones.

Show all John Pullo's Articles
cigar advisor #nowsmoking cigar review toscano master aged serie 1 - cover

#NowSmoking: Toscano Master Aged Serie 1

Reading Time: 5 minutes If you’ve ever been curious about those little “Italian style” cigars, this review of the Toscano Master Aged Serie 1 will interest you. Made in Italy with mostly American tobaccos, the secret is in the aging. Watch now and get the full story.

Read More

The Cigar Advisor Guide to Tobacco Beetles

Reading Time: 4 minutes If left to run rampant, a cigar beetle infestation will reduce cigars to rubble. Find out what these insatiable pests are, how they got into your humidor, and what you can do to get rid of cigar beetles and stop them from coming back.

Read More
cigar advisor #nowsmoking cigar review of partagas limited reserve decadas 2021 - cover

#NowSmoking: Partagas Limited Reserve Decadas 2021 Toro

Reading Time: 4 minutes The Partagas Limited Reserve Decadas 2021 Toro has finally made it to our nowsmoking chronicles, and Gary’s got this one. The star of the blend is a proprietary, Brazilian-grown Cameroon wrapper and it’s a real showstopper. Now see what else makes this one-off so unique.

Read More
Top Cigar Box Buys for Beginners CACoverTop Cigar Box Buys for Beginners Cigar Advisor Cover

2020 CA Report: 5 Top Cigar Box Buys for Beginners

Reading Time: 4 minutes You’ve passed cigar boot camp – now it’s time to go all in on your first box. So many choices…so little time. We make it easy with our five first cigar box buys worthy of pulling the trigger.

Read More