Cigars 101

How to Safely Remove Your Cigar From its Cello

It’s one of those things cigar smokers do almost without thinking; that is, the act of removing cigars from their cello wrappers. Most cigars are wrapped in cello for two reasons: 1) to protect the wrapper leaves from being damaged, and 2) to keep the cigars fresh during shipping. Cigars presented without cellos are called “Cabinet Selection,” since they are traditionally stored in a cabinet humidor in their factory boxes. There’s no specific rule for removing a cigar from its cello. As long as you can remove the cigar without hurting it, whatever works is fine.

The most common method is to open the cello at the foot and, using your thumb and forefinger, gently push the cigar out from the head. This works most of the time, but sometimes the cigar refuses to come out. You almost can’t blame it. You wouldn’t want to come out of your house knowing that someone was going to set you on fire. All kidding aside, in reality the cello may be just a little tight. You push the cigar out and the band stays in the cello. Oops! A little trick that will help make this easier is, when you open the cello at the foot, take your thumb and forefinger and rub the cello back and forth while gently pulling on it. This will help loosen it up and open it further for easier removal.

If the cello is really tight, do not force the cigar out. All cellos have a seam. Since you’ve already straightened-out the foot end of the cello, you can open it by peeling the cellophane apart at the seam. It will open like an unbuttoned shirt, and you can easily remove the cigar.

Another way to remove your cigar is from the head end of the cello. You’ll notice that cellos are folded down flat at the top. Simply unfold the cello and gently pull the cello apart, or tear it open as you would a snack bar. In either case, the seam will open and you can ease the cigar right out through the top. Some cellos can be a little stubborn, so if you have to, snip it open with some scissors.

Removing your cigars from their cellos should be the least of your problems, but sometimes, either out of laziness or impatience, many a cigar has not made it out of its cello alive.

Gary Korb

Gary Korb

Executive Editor

Gary Korb has been writing and editing content for CigarAdvisor.com since its debut in 2008. An avid cigar smoker for over 30 years, during the past 12 years he has worked on the marketing side of the premium cigar business as a Sr. Copywriter, blogger, and cigar reviewer. A graduate of the Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, prior to his career in the cigar business, Gary worked in the music and video industry as a marketer and a publicist.

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