Cigars 101

Storing Cigars

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Cigar basics include knowing about them, the construction of one, the many different shapes and sizes, and how to enjoy your smoke. To ensure the quality of a cigar and to keep the handmade construction in shape, you will need to properly store your cigar. Storing it will make a difference between having a great smoking stick or a dried out one with an uneven burn. If it is not well maintained and properly stored, it can go bad and will become unable to smoke.

Storing your cigars does not require a lot of work or upkeep. You will only need a few supplies that are generally inexpensive. The highest cost you will see is of the humidor itself. Humidors range in price based on the size, capacity, design, and materials used. Other supplies you will need in addition to a humidor are hygrometers, distilled water or propylene glycol humidor solution, humidifiers, and plenty of cigars. Hygrometers are used to measure the humidity in your humidor and come in both digital and analog styles. Choosing which style is a personal choice, however digital ones will give you a more accurate reading.

Once you have picked out a humidor that you like for storage, you have to prepare it. You simply cannot place your sticks in it and expect them to be stored properly. You have to season the humidor and get the humidity to the correct level. To season the humidor you will need a rag or washcloth and distilled water. Pull out any and all trays from inside and lay them out. Then wet the rag or washcloth with the distilled water and run down every piece of wood until it is damp but not soaked. You will need to rub both the inside of the humidor and all of the trays.

You will also need to prepare the humidifiers with either the propylene glycol mixture or distilled water. Both of these solutions will work fine to maintain the humidity, and it is a personal preference as to which mixture you want to use. Pour in one of the mixtures into the humidifier until it is full and saturated. Pour out any excessive mixture. Once the humidor is seasoned, you can then place the humidifiers throughout your humidor. Place a hygrometer in it as well and wait for the humidity level to reach 68-74% humidity.

Once the correct humidity level is reached, you can then fill your humidor with cigars. Smoking a properly maintained cigar will ensure the best flavor and the most even burn. If the humidity level drops, you may need to add more solution to the humidifiers. You should check the levels every two weeks, and you will probably need to refill the humidifiers once a month.

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Jason
11 years ago

I am in the military and moving to Germany in December. What is the best way to store cigars for a journey that will probably require storage time and weather Bavarian winter temperatures? I have about 85 cigars and most have been in my humidor for over a year. They are in 71% humidity and have been for over a year. I bought most of them while deployed and don’t smoke as often at home. I am concerned they will be smashed or dry up and crack by the time I meet up with them in Germany.

Jason
11 years ago

I am in the military and moving to Germany in December. What is the best way to store cigars for a journey that will probably require storage time and weather Bavarian winter temperatures? I have about 85 cigars and most have been in my humidor for over a year. They are in 71% humidity and have been for over a year. I bought most of them while deployed and don’t smoke as often at home. I am concerned they will be smashed or dry up and crack by the time I meet up with them in Germany.

Gary Korb
11 years ago

Hi Jason,
First of all, thank you for your service and good luck on your assignment in Germany. I have the perfect solution for you. Pick up the Perdomo 80-cigar travel case (http://bit.ly/vd2EhR). If you plan on taking fewer cigars, get the 50 count X-treme travel case (http://bit.ly/vC91CY). Both will keep your cigars fresh, airtight and watertight. The foam will also help keep them from bouncing around, as well as insulated, but they will still get cold, so you want to keep the humidity up there around 71-75% RH. For what you’re doing, I don’t see anything else made that’s as rugged and still keeps your cigars fresh.

Gary Korb
11 years ago

Hi Jason,
First of all, thank you for your service and good luck on your assignment in Germany. I have the perfect solution for you. Pick up the Perdomo 80-cigar travel case (http://bit.ly/vd2EhR). If you plan on taking fewer cigars, get the 50 count X-treme travel case (http://bit.ly/vC91CY). Both will keep your cigars fresh, airtight and watertight. The foam will also help keep them from bouncing around, as well as insulated, but they will still get cold, so you want to keep the humidity up there around 71-75% RH. For what you’re doing, I don’t see anything else made that’s as rugged and still keeps your cigars fresh.

Jim
11 years ago

When storing a cigar in a humidor, do you leave it in the plastic rapper they usually come in or do you remove the wrapper?

Jim
11 years ago

When storing a cigar in a humidor, do you leave it in the plastic rapper they usually come in or do you remove the wrapper?

Gary Korb
11 years ago

It really depends on what you think is best, depending on your situation. If you smoke through your cigars relatively quickly, it doesn’t matter if they remain in their cellos or not. Though they will age nicely in their cellos, traditionally, the cellos are removed. I only keep my most expensive cigars in their cellos to prevent damaging the wrappers, but I also cut the cello off at the foot to give them some added air-flow. Best thing I could suggest would be to try storing some of the same cigars with the cello and some without. If you age your cigars, compare the difference of the two cigars after a couple of months.

Gary Korb
11 years ago

It really depends on what you think is best, depending on your situation. If you smoke through your cigars relatively quickly, it doesn’t matter if they remain in their cellos or not. Though they will age nicely in their cellos, traditionally, the cellos are removed. I only keep my most expensive cigars in their cellos to prevent damaging the wrappers, but I also cut the cello off at the foot to give them some added air-flow. Best thing I could suggest would be to try storing some of the same cigars with the cello and some without. If you age your cigars, compare the difference of the two cigars after a couple of months.

John Pullo

John Pullo

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This is not his picture, nor does he even have a beard. A solid 'B' student and occasional low-fi musician, John is a medley of cynicism and sarcasm crammed into a wrinkled Oxford shirt who makes it nearly intolerable to watch reality television with him in the same room. Interestingly, his Social Security number is all ones.

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