Cigar Humidification

The 70/70 Myth: Why a lower RH is often better for your cigars

I remember when I first got seriously into smoking premium cigars. I read all the magazines, bought a few books and absorbed as much as I could. One thing these sources had in common with regard to cigar storage was that cigars were to be kept in a humidor at an approximate temperature of 70 degrees F? and a relative humidity (RH) of 70%. This is also known as “the 70/70 rule.”

Under those conditions, if you can keep your cigars there within a point or two, they will fare quite well. But unless their humidors are kept in climate controlled rooms, most cigar smokers know the reality; in the winter it’s too cold; in the summer it’s too hot – you get the idea.

Based on my own experience, as well as the trusted word of colleagues and other long-time cigar smokers, keeping your cigars at temperatures around 65° and the humidity at an average RH of around 67% is a good comfort level. Some aficionados keep the RH even lower than that as you’ll see shortly.

Moreover, I once read an article about the Davidoff cigar store in London in which the writer said the store has a walk-in humidor solely for vintage cigars that’s kept so cold you practically need a winter coat. But you can bet that the humidity in that humidor is perfectly balanced so those rare primos don’t lose their finer qualities.

Note that the higher the relative humidity, the softer your cigars will be, which can cause burn problems. When the RH is lower, your cigars will feel a bit firmer. If the RH and temperature are too low, your cigars will eventually lose their moisture and turn into kindling. It’s also interesting to note that many cigar smokers who have cigars with thick wrappers, like Maduros for instance, say that they fare better at a lower RH, closer to around 65%. This is most likely due to the higher amount of oils in the wrapper leaf.

As cited above with the London cigar store, there must also be a balance between the temperature and humidity.

Here’s something that may help prove the point. I have an old 25-cigar humidor on my office desk. During the summer the average temperature in the box is a pretty constant 75-degrees. Going “by the book,” that would appear to be a little high. With a standard small round humidifier in the box the humidity gets up to around 68%. The result is the cigars border on squishy and burn crappy. After removing the humidifier the RH went down to about 62%. That would appear frighteningly low to a lot of cigar smokers, yet the cigars settled down and burned well.

When the RH dipped to 60%, feeling a little paranoid, I put a small Boveda 75% packet in the box to give the RH a boost. (Not one of their regular sized packets. This one was about the size of those wipes you get at the local rib joint.) Within two days, the RH was up to 68% and cigars were all soft again. So, into the trash went the packet and you now see how delicate the conditions can be in some cases. More importantly, it is not healthy to expose your cigars to wide fluctuations in temperature and humidity.

The basic rule for higher and lower than average temperatures is, High temp/Lower RH; Low temp/Higher RH. As for me, I try to keep the temp/humidity balanced at about 68 degrees/67% RH average year round. Eventually you’ll find the right mix for your humidor, plus humidors vary too, based on the size of the box, type of humidifier, etc. The key is to find the comfort zone that works best for your cigars.

19
Leave a Reply

avatar
19 Comment threads
0 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
10 Comment authors
JasonRobert KerhoniJulian CohenBryanAnonymous Recent comment authors
newest oldest most voted
Mike D.
Guest
Mike D.

This is a very accurate description of how RH and temp affects your stogies. I too have gone thru this exercise and found that a little less humity works wonders for the burn and firmness (my stogies and I live in South Florida). I keep the house at 77 degrees and the RH at 65%. Perfect for me. Give it a try and I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised. Oh – and please give those new arrivals a few weeks in the humi before lighting up. Really improves the overall experience.

Mike D.
Guest
Mike D.

This is a very accurate description of how RH and temp affects your stogies. I too have gone thru this exercise and found that a little less humity works wonders for the burn and firmness (my stogies and I live in South Florida). I keep the house at 77 degrees and the RH at 65%. Perfect for me. Give it a try and I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised. Oh – and please give those new arrivals a few weeks in the humi before lighting up. Really improves the overall experience.

Mister Moo
Guest
Mister Moo

70/70 is bad, old advice. 70% is near to soggy, sour stogies and 70* is near to mold and beetles. Never knew why anyone who smoked cigars thought this was a good range. It’s too wet and too warm.

Mister Moo
Guest
Mister Moo

70/70 is bad, old advice. 70% is near to soggy, sour stogies and 70* is near to mold and beetles. Never knew why anyone who smoked cigars thought this was a good range. It’s too wet and too warm.

Stogie Bryan
Guest
Stogie Bryan

I have been smoking cigars for years and smoked everthing from $150 FFOXs to machine made (disgusting) White Owl cigars and everything in between. I agree, 70% humidity is WAY too wet. I always had issues with draw and burn when I tried to keep the golden 70/70 rule. Maybe that is great for a warehouse storing pallets of cigars, but for a good smoking cigar right out of my humidor, I like about 65%. I have also noticed different cigars favor different humidities. EMS tend to like it a little damper, while some of my double maduros don’t mind… Read more »

Stogie Bryan
Guest
Stogie Bryan

I have been smoking cigars for years and smoked everthing from $150 FFOXs to machine made (disgusting) White Owl cigars and everything in between. I agree, 70% humidity is WAY too wet. I always had issues with draw and burn when I tried to keep the golden 70/70 rule. Maybe that is great for a warehouse storing pallets of cigars, but for a good smoking cigar right out of my humidor, I like about 65%. I have also noticed different cigars favor different humidities. EMS tend to like it a little damper, while some of my double maduros don’t mind… Read more »

Michael Mastro
Guest

I recently read an article that advise letting cigars dry for a few days in an un-humidified cigar box or humidor. The point is that cigars smoke and taste better at 65-68, than they do at 70-72.

Michael Mastro
Guest

I recently read an article that advise letting cigars dry for a few days in an un-humidified cigar box or humidor. The point is that cigars smoke and taste better at 65-68, than they do at 70-72.

Bryan
Guest
Bryan

I guess everybody has their own opinion on how they like their cigars. low RH/high temp High RH/low temp makes sense to me. It sounds like they compensate for each reading. I’m a newbie to the cigar world. Just bought my first humidor and trying to season mine. I live in central FL. I keep my house at 75* In the seasoning process my humidor is at 68% 77*. I’m using a 2 oz xikar clear jar.

Bryan
Guest
Bryan

I guess everybody has their own opinion on how they like their cigars. low RH/high temp High RH/low temp makes sense to me. It sounds like they compensate for each reading. I’m a newbie to the cigar world. Just bought my first humidor and trying to season mine. I live in central FL. I keep my house at 75* In the seasoning process my humidor is at 68% 77*. I’m using a 2 oz xikar clear jar.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

This post is accurate up to the last paragraph.

Just to correct old myths here, the relative humidity needs to be maintained regardless of temperature. See this article http://www.cigargroup.com/faq/#5.0a . Whatever RH you pick, maintain that RH at your chosen storage temperature.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

This post is accurate up to the last paragraph.

Just to correct old myths here, the relative humidity needs to be maintained regardless of temperature. See this article http://www.cigargroup.com/faq/#5.0a . Whatever RH you pick, maintain that RH at your chosen storage temperature.

Dave
Guest
Dave

One thing that has to be remembered when talking about relative humidity is that temperature and humidity go hand in hand. They are relative to each other. When talking about cigars, RH means temperature and % humidity and have to be referred together.

Dave
Guest
Dave

One thing that has to be remembered when talking about relative humidity is that temperature and humidity go hand in hand. They are relative to each other. When talking about cigars, RH means temperature and % humidity and have to be referred together.

Jason Nam
Guest
Jason Nam

why would you use a 75% boveda? you should have used a 70 or 68 if you’re going with your theory.
I would probably agree with this. I do see the softer cigars, may switch to lower RH Bovedas

Julian Cohen
Guest
Julian Cohen

I live in the Palm Springs area which is known for having the same humidity factors as the Gobi desert.
I have a fairly new humidor and keep the Rh between 70 and 72%, yet I still hear a slight crunch when I cut the end off to light a cigar.
Could I be using the wrong fluid for the humidifier?

Robert Kerhoni
Guest
Robert Kerhoni

I have a humidor it reads 71 degrees and 61 % humidity is that good where it’s at?

Jason
Guest
Jason

So instead of the 70/70 rule , you opt for the 68/67
Rule. I’ve smoked since the 1970’s you’re putting way too much thought into it. Let’s lite up and just move along.

trackback

[…] sure that the temperature level never exceeds 72°F or 22°C, because this can give rise to a cigar smoker’s worse nightmare: tobacco beetle […]

John Pullo

John Pullo

Editor in Chief

This is not his picture, nor does he even have a beard. A solid 'B' student and occasional low-fi musician, John is a medley of cynicism and sarcasm crammed into a wrinkled Oxford shirt who makes it nearly intolerable to watch reality television with him in the same room. Interestingly, his Social Security number is all ones.

Show all John Pullo's Articles
How to Use a Wineador NewAir CC-300H Wineador Review Cigar Advisor Cover

Cigar Advisor Review: NewAir CC-300H Wineador + How to Use a Wineador

Is your cigar stash growing? Learn how to use a wineador to store your cigars – and see our review of the NewAir CC-300H wineador, as this maybe your next storage solution. BONUS Promo code inside!

Read More
The Cigar Advisor Playlist: Volume 3 (Woodstock Edition)

The Cigar Advisor Playlist: Volume 3 (Woodstock Edition)

In this edition of the Cigar Advisor Playlist, we celebrate the 50th anniversary of Woodstock. Check out our groovy picks of cigars paired with songs played at America’s greatest music festival.

Read More
best new cigar accessories 2018 cacover

2018 CA REPORT: Best New Cigar Accessories for 2018

Looking for the most innovative new cigar accessories? We’ve combed the market for the latest must-have cigar tools, from hi-tech hygrometers and smart humidors to LED lighters and more… if you’re ready to upgrade your cigar gear, consult this guide FIRST – see the list inside!

Read More
CACover Literary Cigars Top 5

CA Report: 6 Top Literary Cigars Inspired by the Written Word

The authors of the classics knew that cigars and relaxation go hand in hand; add a good book, and it's bliss. See our list of literary cigars that prove it.
Read More